Nepalese elephants broke the Ministry of Forestry hut and uprooted many trees

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Because of the elephant camp in the Madha forest, the farmers lost their sleep.
Bankeganj. A group of elephants that reached the Kishanpur Sanctuary of the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve after leaving the Shukla Phanta Wildlife Sanctuary in Nepal caused a lot of turmoil in Madha Forest on Sunday evening. Elephants have uprooted many trees, including a hut belonging to the forestry office. Because of the nuisance by elephants, farmers in the surrounding villages have lost sleep. After leaving the Shukla Phanta Wildlife Sanctuary in Nepal, the herd of Nepalese elephants first reached the Haripur Range of the Pilibhit Tiger Reserve and then through the Maharajnagar beet forest of the Bhira Range of the buffer zone and reached the burst well. From here, the Pipra Sultanpur Beat of the Mailani Range crossed the great canal and reached the Madha Forest. These elephants have been camping here for two days.
On Sunday evening around eight o’clock, the elephant team reached the bridge of the great canal that runs over the Bhira-Palia motorway. From there, these elephants did not turn to the fields, but destroyed the hut of the forestry office near the Chappan crossing. Many trees were also uprooted.
These elephants damaged bamboo, sycamore and banyan trees there by advancing near the villages around the forest of the Mailani chain. After wandering around here and there all night, they returned to the Madha forest hideout around five in the morning. According to the surveillance teams, a group of elephants was seen at that time walking towards the pond that was being built in the middle of the forest. It is estimated that the herd includes 10 to 12 elephants, including children. This was confirmed by the footprints of adult elephants and their young on the trails of the forest and the great canal.
Sanjay Pathak, Chief Conservator of Forests / Field Director of the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve, has instructed the surveillance teams to closely monitor the elephants. The forestry office has appealed to the farmers living in the forest to play drums and drums to protect the harvest from elephants. As soon as you hear the arrival of elephants, light a fire in the fields and do not go near them. Immediately notify the forest staff of the arrival of elephants.
It has been confirmed that wild elephants from Nepal live in Madha forest. During the night these elephants severely damaged the forest office’s hut and many trees. They are continuously monitored.
– Manoj Sonkar, Conservator of Forests / Deputy Director of Dudhwa National Park
Farmers’ concern: elephants shouldn’t ruin the happiness of the home
Bankeganj. Nepalese elephants have come to the fore in front of the farmers in the villages around the Kishanpur Sanctuary and the buffer zone of the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve. There are rice, sugar cane and banana plants in their fields. Sugar cane and banana are elephants’ favorite foods. In such a situation, farmers fear the destruction of their crops due to the arrival of wild elephants. Not only do farmers’ hopes rest on these harvests, but also the good fortune to meet household expenses.
Farmer Dharmendra Singh, a resident of Pahar Nagar, says there is a danger of their crops being trampled by wild elephants camping in the adjacent Madha Forest. Their rice and sugar cane crops were destroyed by these elephants who arrived two years ago.
Farmer Dilbag Singh, a resident of the village of Pahar Nagar, says that fear of the Nepalese elephants camping in Madha Forest for two days has lost their sight. They fear that their crops will be ruined by these angry elephants turning into the fields.
Farmer Ladi Singh, a resident of the village of Pahar Nagar, says a herd of wild elephants camping in Madha Forest a few steps from the village are in danger of reaching their fields. The wild elephants that came two years ago had trampled and ruined their crops.
Farmer Sandeep Singh, a resident of Puranpur village, says the herd of Nepalese elephants in Madha Forest has become a disaster for farmers. Elephants rest during the day and when they come out at night they will reach the fields adjacent to the forest and destroy the farmers’ crops. This increases the farmers’ problems.

Because of the elephant camp in the Madha forest, the farmers lost their sleep.

Bankeganj. A group of elephants that reached the Kishanpur Sanctuary of the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve after leaving the Shukla Phanta Wildlife Sanctuary in Nepal caused much turmoil in Madha Forest on Sunday evening. Elephants have uprooted many trees, including a hut belonging to the forestry office. Because of the nuisance from elephants, farmers in the surrounding villages have lost sleep. After leaving the Shukla Phanta Wildlife Sanctuary in Nepal, the herd of Nepalese elephants first reached the Haripur Range of the Pilibhit Tiger Reserve and then through the Maharajnagar beet forest of the Bhira Range of the buffer zone and reached the burst well. From here, the Pipra Sultanpur Beat of the Mailani Range crossed the great canal and reached the Madha Forest. These elephants have been camping here for two days.

On Sunday evening around eight o’clock, the elephant team reached the bridge of the great canal that runs over the Bhira-Palia motorway. From there, these elephants did not turn to the fields, but destroyed the hut of the forestry office near the Chappan crossing. Many trees were also uprooted.

These elephants damaged bamboo, sycamore and banyan trees there by advancing near the villages around the forest of the Mailani chain. After wandering around here and there all night, they returned to the Madha forest hideout around five in the morning. According to the surveillance teams, a group of elephants was seen at this point walking towards the pond that was being built in the middle of the forest. It is estimated that the herd includes 10 to 12 elephants, including children. This was confirmed by the footprints of adult elephants and their young on the trails of the forest and the great canal.

Sanjay Pathak, Chief Conservator of Forests / Field Director of the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve, has instructed the surveillance teams to closely monitor the elephants. The forestry office has appealed to the farmers living in the forest to play drums and drums to protect the harvest from elephants. As soon as you hear the arrival of elephants, light a fire in the fields and do not go near them. Immediately notify the forest staff of the arrival of elephants.

It has been confirmed that wild elephants from Nepal live in Madha forest. During the night these elephants severely damaged the forest office’s hut and many trees. They are continuously monitored.

– Manoj Sonkar, Conservator of Forests / Deputy Director of Dudhwa National Park

Farmers’ concern: elephants shouldn’t ruin the happiness of the home

Bankeganj. Nepalese elephants have come to the fore in front of the farmers in the villages around the Kishanpur Sanctuary and the buffer zone of the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve. There are rice, sugar cane and banana plants in their fields. Sugar cane and banana are elephants’ favorite foods. In such a situation, farmers fear the destruction of their crops due to the arrival of wild elephants. Not only do farmers’ hopes rest on these harvests, but also the good fortune to meet household expenses.

Farmer Dharmendra Singh, a resident of Pahar Nagar, says there is a danger of their crops being trampled by wild elephants camping in the adjacent Madha Forest. Their rice and sugar cane crops were destroyed by these elephants who arrived two years ago.

Farmer Dilbag Singh, a resident of the village of Pahar Nagar, says that fear of the Nepalese elephants camping in Madha Forest for two days has lost their sight. They fear that their crops will be ruined by these angry elephants turning into the fields.

Farmer Ladi Singh, a resident of the village of Pahar Nagar, says a herd of wild elephants camping in Madha Forest a few steps from the village are in danger of reaching their fields. The wild elephants that came two years ago had trampled and ruined their crops.

Farmer Sandeep Singh, a resident of Puranpur village, says the herd of Nepalese elephants in Madha Forest has become a disaster for farmers. Elephants rest during the day and when they come out at night they will reach the fields adjacent to the forest and destroy the farmers’ crops. This increases the farmers’ problems.

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( News Source – Amar Ujala )

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