Most Endangered Indigenous Breed Cow Of Advanced Variety Will Grow In Destitute And Nomadic Cows Surrogacy Method

Jayendra Nath Chaturvedi, Amar Ujala Network, Mirzapur Published by: Utpal Kant Updated Wed, 04 Aug 2021 05:10 PM IST

Summary The clouds of crisis are hovering over the advanced indigenous breeds of India, Sahiwal, Gangatiri and Gir. These breeds are almost extinct. While they are considered to have many qualities. In view of the importance of these breeds, the responsibility of their conservation and promotion has been taken up by the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences of BHU.

Now cows will also conceive by surrogacy method. From the womb of the destitute, nomadic cows of the Vindhya region, there will be a chance to flourish and flourish the endangered variety of indigenous breeds. In the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences located at Rajiv Gandhi Campus in BHU’s Barkachha, preparations are being made to make surrogate mothers of 80 cows here, from which children of indigenous Sahiwal, Gangatiri, Gir of advanced breed will be born. India’s advanced indigenous breeds Sahiwal, Gangatiri and Gir are in danger. These breeds are almost extinct. While they are considered to have many qualities. In view of the importance of these breeds, the responsibility of their conservation and promotion has been taken up by the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences of BHU.

In order to produce more and more breeds in less time, the doctors of the faculty are working on a project funded by the National Finance Development Scheme. Under this scheme, destitute, nomadic breed cows are to be selected. In the pilot project of this scheme costing 27 crores, 80 cows are to be prepared as surrogate mothers. These will prepare 80 children of advanced indigenous breed.

The pilot project is expected to be completed by the end of 2022. The process of selection of cows for surrogate mother and testing of their health has started. It will take about 10 months for the calf to be born. Dr. Utkarsh Kumar Tripathi, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, said that the endangered indigenous breeds would be protected and promoted through surrogate mothers.With this, while on one hand the precious breeds will be safe, on the other hand the nomadic cows will get support. Crops will also be saved from damage. Prof. Ramadevi Nimannapally, Dean of the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences said that the total cost of this project funded by the National Finance Development Scheme is Rs.27 crore. The objective of the scheme is to preserve and promote the country’s precious advanced indigenous livestock. Our team of doctors has started work on it.
The eggs of improved indigenous breed cows will be fertilized with the sperm of superior breed bulls. After this the prepared zygote will be implanted in the womb of the surrogate cows. The doctors and trained staff of the Faculty will take care of the cows during nine months and nine days of pregnancy. The unborn child will receive only protection and nourishment from the surrogate mother. Their quality will basically be that of the improved indigenous breeds. Explanation Now cows will also conceive by surrogacy method. From the womb of the destitute, nomadic cows of the Vindhya region, there will be a chance to flourish and flourish the endangered variety of indigenous breeds. In the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences located at Rajiv Gandhi Campus in BHU’s Barkachha, preparations are being made to make surrogate mothers of 80 cows here, from which children of indigenous Sahiwal, Gangatiri, Gir of advanced breed will be born.

India’s advanced indigenous breeds Sahiwal, Gangatiri and Gir are in danger. These breeds are almost extinct. While they are considered to have many qualities. In view of the importance of these breeds, the responsibility of their conservation and promotion has been taken up by the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences of BHU.

In order to produce more and more breeds in less time, the doctors of the faculty are working on a project funded by the National Finance Development Scheme. Under this scheme, destitute, nomadic breed cows are to be selected. In the pilot project of this scheme costing 27 crores, 80 cows are to be prepared as surrogate mothers. These will prepare 80 children of advanced indigenous breed.

The pilot project is expected to be completed by the end of 2022. The process of selection of cows for surrogate mother and testing of their health has started. It will take about 10 months for the calf to be born. Dr. Utkarsh Kumar Tripathi, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, said that the endangered indigenous breeds would be protected and promoted through surrogate mothers.With this, while on one hand the precious breeds will be safe, on the other hand the nomadic cows will get support. Crops will also be saved from damage. Prof. Ramadevi Nimannapally, Dean of the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences said that the total cost of this project funded by the National Finance Development Scheme is Rs.27 crore. The objective of the scheme is to preserve and promote the country’s precious advanced indigenous livestock. Our team of doctors has started work on it.

Such would be the surrogacy method

The eggs of improved indigenous breed cows will be fertilized with the sperm of superior breed bulls. After this the prepared zygote will be implanted in the womb of the surrogate cows. The doctors and trained staff of the Faculty will take care of the cows during nine months and nine days of pregnancy. The unborn child will receive only protection and nourishment from the surrogate mother. Their quality will basically be that of the improved indigenous breeds.

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( News Source – Amar Ujala )

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