Marathe and Prayagraj: Ahilyabai Holkar’s gift is Kachcha Wada, Pakka Wada from Daraganj

Prayagraj News: Ahilya Bai Holkar.
– Photo: Pratagraj

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Prayagraj. Directly in front of the State Bank of India in Daraganj, if you continue from the south side towards Mori Marg, many old dilapidated buildings want to stop under the new buildings and say something. Indeed, these buildings are a living history of the relationship between Prayagraj and Maratha rulers that the dust of time may have fallen on, but the story of the Bhonsle and Holkar rulers still strikes inside.When you enter through a small door in Mori, you will be amazed to see a large courtyard as soon as you cross the corridor, with verandas, chambers and temples everywhere. Here a full-fledged Maratha society still gives air to culture. Despite the stone courtyard, porch, and chambers, it is known as Kachha Wada. If you go down an alley to the north there is also Pucca Wada and on the south side of the State Bank are Yashwant and Basant Wada.

These wadas are evidence of the contribution of Ahilyabai Holkar, the Rajmata of Indore, to the enrichment of Prayagraj. It was his contribution in the 18th century that the Malwa region entered the Golden Age. After assuming power as Queen of Malwa in 1767, she dedicated the Kingdom of Malwa to her deity Lord Shiva and declared that she would take power by considering Lord Shiva as her protector and doing public welfare work. Even in all of his official orders, the ruler’s signature was replaced by ‘Shri Shankar’.In addition to preserving, renovating and renovating temples, they not only built inns, lodgings, dharamshalas, but also made cooks there for the pilgrims’ free meals. She did not live in 1795, when she was about 70 years old, but her traces are still present across the country. Baba Abhay Awasthi, who is well aware of the cultural heritage of Prayagraj, says a similar mark of Ahilyabai are these wadas that were built for the pilgrims in Daraganj village.

Manoj Kelkar, associated with Maharashtra Lok Seva Mandal, who lives in Kachha Wada, added, “The queen of religious instincts built these stations only to house and feed the pilgrims who came to Prayag. Kachcha Wada was made first and then Pucca, then Yashwant and Basant Wada. The idols of Ahilyabai and Dattatreya ji are installed in the temples that were built on the western veranda in Kachha Wada itself. Maharani Ahilya’s successor, Tukoji Rao Maharaj, continued his tradition and built a temple of Martandeshwar Mahadev in Kachha Wada in 1912.

This is how the names of the wars came about
There are different opinions about the nomenclature of the stations. One section believes it was called the Kutcha Wada because of the architectural style of the Kutcha houses, while the Pucca Wada also has a story above the Pucca roof. At the same time, some people say that these stations were named after the food. Those who had to eat uncooked food stayed at the Kutcha Wada, while the pilgrims who wanted to eat the Pucca food stayed at the Pucca Wada.
The Bhonsle government had set up a wada to take care of the guru’s samadhi.
On behalf of Holkar Stere, a wada was also built right in front of the State Bank and Ganga Bhawan, where the Joshi family lives. Hundreds of years old Shami tree is in its grounds. Purohit Dinkar Joshi and Balram Joshi tell that this Wada was built by order of the Bhonsle ruler of Nagpur many decades after the conquest of Allahabad and is called the Wada of Bhonsle Sarkar. On the first floor of this wada, not far from the Shami tree, is the living tomb of Maratha Guru Keja Ji Maharaj, for whose worship and care the priests were erected.

Detailed

Prayagraj. Directly in front of the State Bank of India in Daraganj, if you continue from the south side towards Mori Marg, many old dilapidated buildings want to stop under the new buildings and say something. Indeed, these buildings are a living history of the relationship between Prayagraj and Maratha rulers that the dust of time may have fallen on, but the story of the Bhonsle and Holkar rulers still strikes inside.

When you enter through a small door in Mori, you will be amazed to see a large courtyard as soon as you cross the corridor, with verandas, chambers and temples everywhere. Here a full-fledged Maratha society still gives air to culture. Despite the stone courtyard, porch, and chambers, it is known as Kachha Wada. If you leave a street on the north side, there is also the Pakka Wada and on the south side of the state bank are Yashwant and Basant Wada.

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( News Source – Amar Ujala )

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